The ‘Longhorn’ of the beetle family

Print Article

  • Photos by DON BARTLING Beetles are like all insects, they have a head, thorax and six legs.

  • 1

    Left: The Root Borer beetle has a saw toothed antenna more than 2/3 the length of his body. Right: The ‘Longhorn’ of the beetle family!

  • 2

  • Photos by DON BARTLING Beetles are like all insects, they have a head, thorax and six legs.

  • 1

    Left: The Root Borer beetle has a saw toothed antenna more than 2/3 the length of his body. Right: The ‘Longhorn’ of the beetle family!

  • 2

Last week while barbecuing on my patio I was suddenly alarmed by an uninvited guest that flew in and landed on my pavers beside the table next to the grill. The big bug started screeching an alarming sound. The disturbing guest was a robust, reddish brown, almost black colored bug. He appeared to be a giant beetle with unusually long antennas.

Having been intrigued by his size, appearance and noise making ability I decided to get my camera and take a few pictures. Upon close inspection I noticed the bug had three sharp spines on each side of the thorax and saw-toothed antennae. Upon researching the male Giant Root Borer Beetle or California prionus I found the most impressive characteristics were an antennae with 12 segments more than two-thirds the length of their body. The female has a more slender antennae about half of their body length. The adults are active in the summer time through early fall, they fly at dusk or in the evening.

The beetle makes its sound by rocking his head up and down, it rubs ridges against the inside margin of the thorax to create the squeaking sound, a form of sound production among many insects called “stridulation.” It is usually only the male that calls and each species has its own distinctive song.

The Giant Root Borer Beetle or California prionus is widely distributed in western North America from Baja California and Mexico to Alaska. The majority of the three to five year life cycle is spent underground as larvae, feeding on the roots of trees and shrubs. The larvae are often referred to as round-headed borers because of their cylindrical body shape. The adults are commonly known as long-horned beetles because of the extended length of their antennae. Infestations can cause direct or indirect death of fruit trees due to girdling of the root cambium and introduction of secondary pathogens that lead to decay. Once an orchard is infested, it is difficult to prevent increase and spread of the beetle to nearby trees.

Larvae are cream to brown in color and grow from less than 1/4 inch to 3 inches in length over a three to five-year period. Body segmentation is strongly evident and the head is dark brown with large chewing mandibles.

The larvae feed primarily on living deciduous trees and also on roots of vines, grasses and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. They will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils such as apple, cherry and peach.

The adult is attracted to light at night and sounds like a small airplane approaching. The larvae develop in dead and decaying logs, stumps and roots, and the adults emerge during the summer months. Almost any dead wood will serve as a breeding site. Both larvae and adults are relatively harmless. The adult might pinch you with its mouth parts if you pick it up wrong. The adults are vulnerable to animals eating them including skunks, owls, cats and some bats.

Discover Boundary County. Enjoy the outdoors!

Print Article

Read More Outdoors

The changing colors of the Western larch

October 18, 2018 at 6:00 am | Bonners Ferry Herald Along with the leafy trees that change colors each fall, one pine tree also puts on a colorful show each autumn. In late fall, the Western larch’s (Larix Occidentalis) needles turn yellow and then dr...

Comments

Read More

Falling for autumn in Boundary County

October 11, 2018 at 6:00 am | Bonners Ferry Herald “I would rather sit on a pumpkin, and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion.” — Henry David Thoreau Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and beauty is easy to observe in Bounda...

Comments

Read More

Respect your elderberries!

October 04, 2018 at 6:00 am | Bonners Ferry Herald Many wild berry species make their home on the banks of rivers and streams in Boundary County, where the fertile soil that accumulates produces abundant crops. One that is in full color now along the...

Comments

Read More

There is a mouse in the house!

September 27, 2018 at 6:00 am | Bonners Ferry Herald Actually he wasn’t in the house, he was in the garage and in a six-gallon plastic bucket, which somehow he placed himself into and couldn’t get out. My wife alerted me to his presence with a loud exc...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 267-5521
Po Box 539
Bonners Ferry, Id 83805

©2018 Bonners Ferry Herald Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X